Archive for February, 2013

Starting 2013 Claiming a Home Office on Your Taxes Will Get Easier

February 23, 2013

Starting 2013 Claiming a Home Office on Your Taxes Will Get Easier

If you claim your home office as a tax deduction, the IRS has good news for you. Starting in 2013, taxpayers who work primarily from home will have the option to use a simplified form based on their office’s square footage.

The new optional deduction, capped at $1,500 per year based on $5 a square foot for up to 300 square feet, will reduce a lot the paperwork and record keeping burden on eligible small businesses. No longer will taxpayers who claim the home-office deduction have to keep such detailed records throughout the year, fill out lengthy forms, and calculate related expenses. However, depending on your Tax situation, it could cost you more money to use the new form, according to the “Wall Street Journal.”

The new option provides eligible taxpayers an easier path (but not necessarily the most Tax benefit method) to claiming the home office deduction. Currently, they are generally required to fill out a 43-line form (Form 88299) often with complex calculations of allocated expenses, depreciation and carryovers of unused deductions. Taxpayers claiming the optional deduction will complete a significantly simplified form.

 

Business expenses unrelated to the home, such as advertising, supplies and wages paid to employees are still fully deductible. Current restrictions on the home office deduction, such as the requirement that a home office must be used regularly and exclusively for business and the limit tied to the income derived from the particular business, still apply under the new option. The new simplified option is available starting with the 2013 Tax return which most taxpayers file early in 2014. Check with your tax professional to determine which option, the new simplified form or the regular method, is right for you.
For more advice on maximizing your tax deductions, read “Make this year less taxing” from the January/February 2012 “Texas REALTOR®” magazine. To see other Hot Topics and changes in Year 2013, especially related to the Mortgages and Residential Loans, that affect the affordability and qualification of the residential home purchasers, please visit my site at  
 
          http://www.texasfivestarrealty.com/index.asp

 

FHA MIP Rate and Duration Changes starting April 1, 2013 and June 3, 2013

February 20, 2013

FHA MIP Rate and Duration Changes starting April 1, 2013 and June 3, 2013.

FHA MIP Rate and Duration Changes starting April 1, 2013 and June 3, 2013

February 14, 2013

FHA MIP Rate and Duration Changes starting April 1, 2013 and June 3, 2013

The following changes to FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums (MIP) will take effect with the respective case number assignment dates, April 1st, 2013 and June 3rd, 2013. These changes are big and may affect borrowers affordability and/or ability to qualify for FHA financing. 

NOTE: These changes only affect FHA Loans with case numbers assigned after April 1st, 2013 and has nothing to do with the Sales closing date. Therefore, If you have a FHA case number assigned on March 31st, but the sale is closed sometimes in May or after, these changes will not affect your purchase.

These MIP Rate and Duration changes include:

FHA MIp Policy Change starting April 1, 2013
Effective with FHA case numbers assigned on or after  April 1, 2013 FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums will increase.

The increases in the annual MIP specified in this article apply to all mortgages insured under FHA’s Single Family Mortgage Insurance Programs except:

    • Streamline refinance transactions of existing FHA loans that were endorsed on or before May 31, 2009 (see ML 2012-04)

    • For all SF Forward Streamline Refinance transactions that are refinancing FHA loans endorsed on or before May 31, 2009, the Annual MIP will be .55% (55 bps), regardless of the base loan amount and the UFMIP will be decreased to (1 bps) 0.01%
      of the base loan amount.

    • Title I (Home Improvement Loans):
      HUD “Title I” insures private lenders against loss on property improvement loans they make. HUD does not lend money for property improvements. Title I can be used in connection with a 203k Rehabilitation Mortgage. For additional information on HUD “Title I”, please visit HUD website at  http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/housing/sfh/title/ti_abou

    • Home Equity Conversion Mortgages (HECM or Reverse Mortgage)
      Reverse mortgages are increasing in popularity with seniors who have equity in their homes and want to supplement their income. The only reverse mortgage insured by the U.S. Federal Government is called a Home Equity Conversion Mortgage or HECM, and is only available through an FHA approved lender.

    • Section 247 (Hawaiian Homelands)
      FHA’s mortgage insurance provides opportunities to low- and moderate-income Native Hawaiians to purchase a home on Hawaiian home lands. FHA insures loans made to native Hawaiians to purchase one- to four-family dwellings located on Hawaiian home lands.  

  • Section 248 (Indian Reservations)
    A family who purchases a home under this program can apply for financing through a FHA approved lending institution such as a bank, savings and loan, or a mortgage company. To quality, the borrower must meet standard FHA credit qualifications. An eligible borrower can receive approximately 97% financing . An eligible party can produce a gift for the down payment. Closing cost can be financed; covered by a gift, grant, or secondary financing; or paid by the seller without reduction in value.

FHA case numbers assigned on or after April 1, 2013 mean BIG changes for borrowers and may affect their ability to qualify for FHA financing.  These changes include:

Current MIP Rate and Durations Up to

New Rules effective with Case Numbers
Item Changing Current Rules Up to 3/31/2013 Up to 6/2/2013 starting  4/1/2013 starting  6/3/2013
Base Loan Amount < $625,500 MIP Rate MIP Duration MIP Rate MIP Duration
> 15yr Term Annual MIP
(paid Monthly with Mortgage Payment)
MIP Duration
down payment < 5.00% 1.25% Cancelled at 78% LTV & 5 Years 1.35% Loan Term
5.00% < down payment < 10.00% 1.20% Cancelled at 78% LTV & 5 Years 1.30% Loan Term

 10.00% < down payment < 22%

1.20% Cancelled at 78% LTV & 5 Years 1.30% 11 Years
down payment >22.00% 1.20% 5 Years 1.30% 11 Years
< 15yr Term Annual MIP
(paid Monthly with Mortgage Payment)
MIP Duration
down payment < 10.00% 0.60% Cancelled at 78% LTV 0.70% Loan Term
10.00% < down payment < 22% 0.35% Cancelled at 78% LTV 0.45% 11 Years
down payment > 22.00% 0.00% No Annual MIP 0.45% 11 Years

FHA MIp Policy Change starting June 3, 2013
Effective with FHA case numbers assigned on or after June 3, 2013 FHA Mortgage Insurance Duration will change. 

The changes to the duration of the annual MIP as specified in this article are effective for all Single Family FHA programs for which FHA charges an annual MIP except:

    • Title I (Home Improvement Loans):
      HUD “Title I” insures private lenders against loss on property improvement loans they make. HUD does not lend money for property improvements. Title I can be used in connection with a 203k Rehabilitation Mortgage.  

    • Home Equity Conversion Mortgages (HECM or Reverse Mortgage)
      Reverse mortgages are increasing in popularity with seniors who have equity in their homes and want to supplement their income. The only reverse mortgage insured by the U.S. Federal Government is called a Home Equity Conversion Mortgage or HECM, and is only available through an FHA approved lender.

Impact Analysis (Example):
To better understand the impact of these changes on a borrower, let’s use an example with following assumptions.

Let’s assume a borrower is purchasing a house for $200,000 with 3.5% down (LTV=97.5%), and getting a 30-year fixed FHA loan at 4%.

Today, prior to April 1st, 2013, The Monthly MIP Rate and Duration are as follow:
Loan Amount = $200,000 (1-.035) = $200,000 * 0.965= $193,000,  with Monthly Principal + Interest =$921.41
Monthly MIP = (Loan Amount * MIP Rate for 3.5% down )/12 = $200,000 * 96.5% *1.25% /12 = $201.04
The borrower is paying this Monthly MIP until the loan balance <= 78% of the original Loan Amount = .78* $193,000 = $150,540
Using a Mortgage Amortization Table or Calculator, we find out this happens after paying Monthly Mortgage Payment (Principal + Interest) for 124 Months (10 Years and 4 Months).
So, Total MIP the borrower pays for the entire MIP duration would be  $201.04 * 124 = $24,928.96

After June 3rd, 2013, The new Monthly MIP Rate and Duration would be as follow:
Loan Amount = $200,000 (1-.035) = $200,000 * 0.965= $193,000,  with Monthly Principal + Interest =$921.41
Monthly MIP = (Loan Amount * MIP Rate for 3.5% down )/12 = $200,000 * 96.5% *1.35% /12 = $217.125

Increase Monthly MIP
In the above example, This is an increase of $16.09 = $217.125 – $201.04 MIP per month.

Decrease Affordability
In the above example, additional Monthly MIP of $16.09 for 30 years translates into getting a loan of $189,630 (with 4% Interest Rate) to have a monthly payment and interest of $905.32 =$921.41- $16.09. If the borrower were eligible or could afford to purchaser a house at $200,000 (Loan $ 193,300), Now with this additional MIP he/she is eligible or could afford to get a loan for $189,630 (purchase a house with $196,507 =$189,630/.965) to have the same Monthly payment of Principal + Interest + MIP. This is decrease affordability of $3,493 (1.75%)

Increase Total Monthly MIP
The borrower will be paying this Monthly MIP for the entire loan term which is 30 years or 360 Monthly Payments.
Therefore, Total MIP the borrower pays for the entire MIP duration would be  $217.125 * 360 = $78,165.00
This is an increase of $53,236.04 = $78,165.00 -$24,928.96 total MIP for the entire loan term.

A summary of these results are shown in Figure 1.
MIP changes effective April 1, 2013 and June 3, 2013
Assumption:
purchasing a house at $200,000 with 3.5% down (LTV=97.5%), and getting a 30-year fixed FHA loan at 4%.Interest Rate.
Legend:
     Series 1: with FHA case numbers assigned on or before April 1, 2013, Total Monthly MIP would be paid 124 Months * $201.04/Month= $24,928

    Series 2: with FHA case numbers assigned on or after April 1, 2013, AND before June 3, 2013:
Total Additional (compare to Series 1) MIP paid is $ 1,995.16 = $16.09 * 124.
This brings Total Monthly MIP to be paid = $26,923
Series 3: with FHA case numbers assigned on or after
June 3, 2013:
Total Additional (compare to Series 2) MIP paid is $51,242= (360-124)*217.13.
This brings Total Monthly MIP to be paid = $78,165

For more information about these changes and changes related to the Base Loan Amount > $625,500, please visit HUD website at Mortgagee Letter 2013-04.

Click 2013 FHA MIP Impact Analysis Calculator to See the Affect of New MIP Rates (April 1st, 2013) and MIP Duration (June 3, 2013) For Different Cases


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